Dream the Impossible Dream


Back in the days when Dane was a closet barbarian, I had already left the Christian orthodoxy far behind, even while working for a large evangelical organization and preaching in dozens of churches.  In an early post (A New Look at Christian Sexuality) , I posited a new morality based on focusing on the needs of others rather than a set of behavioral rules.  Though presented more directly in my blog, it was originally developed as a sermon I used many times.  Only once did I get called on it being the challenge to the conservative Christianity that it was.

A second sermon I used quite a bit was just as heretical, but again, not openly so.  Anyone who knew much about existentialism would have identified it as an attack on the supernatural determinism of Christianity; however, I was never called on it.

I was tired of Christians being sold on different forms of prosperity gospel theology: you obey God’s rules and your life will prosper.  A life built on this belief will surely only end in bitter disappointment.  Equally disturbing was the belief that there is some cosmic plan and all the events of our lives are part and if we play our role well, then we get some eternal reward someday. A life built on that brand of selfishness will not yield happiness, but the despair of longing.  Both of these beliefs lead to disappointment and misery.

People should not look to outside things to bring personal fulfillment, we find our own meaning and fulfillment by living a life of ethics and meaning. Not meaning based on what we achieve, but in our efforts to help those we find around us.  If I live for fame, or money, or respect or even comfort I give others and circumstances far too much power over me.  The parable of the good Samaritan, was the model, and it was given when Jesus was asked about what was the ultimate rule of God.   The good Samaritan rendered aid to one he found in his way. He did not give thought for repayment or appreciation. He helped because that is who he was. He was living out his image of self and his personal meaning. Thus living, we can find fulfillment in a world of chaos and suffering.

So said Jesus and so says The Barbarian

In my sermons I would end with the story of Don Quixote and used the lyrics from the theme song from the Broadway play based on the book.
To dream … the impossible dream …
To fight … the unbeatable foe …
To bear … with unbearable sorrow …
To run … where the brave dare not go …
To right … the unrightable wrong …
To love … pure and chaste from afar …
To try … when your arms are too weary …
To reach … the unreachable star …

This is my quest, to follow that star …
No matter how hopeless, no matter how far …
To fight for the right, without question or pause …
To be willing to march into Hell, for a Heavenly cause …

And I know if I’ll only be true, to this glorious quest,
That my heart will lie will lie peaceful and calm,
when I’m laid to my rest …
And the world will be better for this:
That one man, scorned and covered with scars,
Still strove, with his last ounce of courage,
To reach … the unreachable star …

 

I have always fancied myself a bit of a Don Quixote.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s